The Windows are the Eyes of the Soul

This week the contractors got most of the windows installed.

Window installation underway

You can also see in this shot that they've started boxing out the edge of the roof for the addition. The idea is that it will match the existing roofline, though the trim will be a little different to differentiate it.

Anyway, for the windows they started by flashing with Fortifiber detail flashing. This is a pretty standard residential flashing detail.

Windows on the stair landing

They also got into gear on the stairs and framed up and installed treads on the upper part of the new back stairs, which was convenient for installing the two windows at the back landing.

Stair landing from above

This is that landing viewed from above.

The windows are Marvin doublehung. They are installed with a sill height that matches the rest of the house, so they had to have opening limiters installed on them. You can sort of see those as a pair of black rectangles on each upper sash. They keep the window from opening more than 4"; for any window with a sill height under 36" above the floor, there can be no opening larger than 4" by default. The opening limiter allows you to override it (if, like us, you do not have small children in the household, or if the house is on fire and you need to get out) and open the window the whole way.

Windows on staircases and in bathing areas also need to be safety glass (tempered or laminated). That's not as obvious from looking at them.

Bay window bedroom with windows

And here's the bay window bedroom with its windows. And look at how the contractors duplicated the arch downstairs up here. We won't be doing the same decorative plaster on this arch, because I'm not trying to make fake history, but I loved how this tied in with the other arches.

Looking to the front of the house

This is the view out the window to the front of the house. We can wave at our neighbors across the street. I guess we could before but the trees were a bit in the way.

Back bedroom windows

And the back bedroom. This is the room that is sized to fit a king-sized bed, which is my one concession to resale value.

I spent the weekend working on elevations of the bedrooms showing electrical locations, and also choosing light fixtures, which is much, much less fun that it sounds. We also went to a wedding, which was lovely and moving. And it was by the beach in San Francisco, so it was cold and foggy, which is just my favourite kind of summer weather.

posted by ayse on 08/28/16

5 Comments

Can you tell us more about the opening limiters? i look on the web and found lots of pictures, but none that looked much like what you have.

Ahhhh that's so exciting!

Let me take some photos to show you how they work. They're nice, although I would have preferred if they blended more into the window. At least they aren't bright red.

I can understand your not choosing to duplicate the decorative work on the arch, but "fake history" seems unfair. As a person to whom modern design does not speak, I don't see anything wrong with replicating old techniques and finishes that have aesthetic virtue.

Now, making a vague stab at replicating them in cheesy materials? I'm right with you on the "fake history" aspect of that.

I just don't want to make the new part of the house look like it was done at the same time as the front part of the house. Where the plaster was removed as part of the work, we will be repairing it to match the original appearance, but in the new part of the house I don't want to use a construction or decoration method that's not used any more.

Note: We're getting pummeled with spam comments, so I've turned off the ability to use any HTML or include any links for the time being. Email with any issues.

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